How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

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Nøkkenbuer
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:52 am

How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by Nøkkenbuer » Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:52 am

I have seen varying opinions on this topic and I'm curious as to how you all rate websites. When rating a site's "trustworthiness," do you consider only the safety and security of the website in question, or do you also factor the integrity or moral standing of its content? For example, if a website contains content which you disapprove of on moral and ethical grounds, but it is otherwise a safe website, would you rate the site as trustworthy or not trustworthy? In order words, would you be rating it "I trust this site because its content is not a threat to my computer" or "I don't trust this site because its content is false, morally objectionable, or otherwise undeserving of my trust"?

In a similar vein, how would you rate "Child Suitability"? Do you simply consider the content of the site in terms of whether it contains pornographic, violent, or otherwise adult material? Or do you also consider whether the content is suitable for children insomuch as the child can understand it, or suitable to the degree that it is morally appropriate? To put in context, would you rate a site that has morally objectionable content but otherwise contains no pornographic, hateful, or violent content as suitable for a child? Alternatively, would you rate a website which is clearly intended for high-leveled learning, such as lessons on calculus, as suitable for children even though the child would not understand its content, thereby making it unsuitable for them?

I struggle with this often and sometimes I rate sites differently as a result. Some websites are safe for my computer, but highly objectionable on moral grounds, so I rate them negatively, while other times I rate them positively and just leave a comment stating that I morally object to the content. In the end, I'm unsure to what extent my comments should reflect my rating of the site, and whether my opinion on the site's content should factor into either. How do you handle these situations? And what rule, if any, do you have for rating websites?

EDIT: Also, for any WOT employee reading this post, a clarification on the intended meanings/purposes of the above two rating categories would be much appreciated. If I knew the intended purpose of each category and which factors are acceptable when considering how to rate a site, I would be much more inclined to rate sites following those parameters.

redblade7
Posts: 520
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 10:18 am

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by redblade7 » Thu Sep 18, 2014 10:19 pm

Malicious sites affect your whether you are an adult or a child. So when I rate a malicious site, both "Trustworthy" and "Child Suitability" get the lowest red rating on the slider.

As for non-malicious sites, sites such as news and political blogs can contain subject matter not suitable for children (gay rights, terrorist attacks, celebrity sex scandals, school shooting, etc). Usually I give these sites the first green bar or the lower end of the first green bar on "Child Suitability" while "Trustworthy" would depend on the content and bias of the site.

"Only for kids" is completely useless to have as a checkbox, in my opinion. It's very rare to have a site like that, except maybe a site along the lines of Nickelodeon, Disney, or Cartoon Network. Maybe we should change it to "Intended for kids" or "Safe for kids" or the like.

Site-rater
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RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by Site-rater » Thu Sep 18, 2014 11:20 pm

<quote user="redblade7">
Malicious sites affect your whether you are an adult or a child. So when I rate a malicious site, both "Trustworthy" and "Child Suitability" get the lowest red rating on the slider.

As for non-malicious sites, sites such as news and political blogs can contain subject matter not suitable for children (gay rights, terrorist attacks, celebrity sex scandals, school shooting, etc). Usually I give these sites the first green bar or the lower end of the first green bar on "Child Suitability" while "Trustworthy" would depend on the content and bias of the site.

"Only for kids" is completely useless to have as a checkbox, in my opinion. It's very rare to have a site like that, except maybe a site along the lines of Nickelodeon, Disney, or Cartoon Network. Maybe we should change it to "Intended for kids" or "Safe for kids" or the like.
[/quote]

It's actually called "Child safety" in the scorecard page, so it would be appropriate to rate down for anything unsafe for children, such as the malicious sites you mention. Your mention of subject matter not suitable for children mentioning gay rights seems a little politicized.

Nøkkenbuer
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2014 4:52 am

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by Nøkkenbuer » Fri Sep 19, 2014 8:27 am

<quote user="bfeely">
It's actually called "Child safety" in the scorecard page, so it would be appropriate to rate down for anything unsafe for children, such as the malicious sites you mention. Your mention of subject matter not suitable for children mentioning gay rights seems a little politicized.
[/quote]

Well, I kind of agree with redblade7. Politically-charged issues and the like aren't really suitable for children, since children are very gullible and impressionable and therefore may not be able to filter the bias inherent in the content. Then again, when I think of "children," I think of children under the age of 13 or 14. Political-charged articles and websites are of course suitable for adolescents and adults, since they are capable of developing informed, sophisticated opinions on political, religious, and ethical issues (even though many don't).

When I rate a political website as "unsuitable for children," I usually do so because the content is either hateful and discriminatory, or it is biased to the extent that I believe it would be unsuitable for a child to use it as a source of knowledge. I do this for websites which endorse both sides of political, religious, or ethical issues, mind you. For example, I've rated the FCKH8 website and its affiliates poorly because while I support LGBT rights and oppose racism, I find their content aggressive, forceful, and counterproductive, not to mention heavily biased and demeaning to people who disagree with them. In a similar vein, I have rated fundamentalist Christian websites which endorse traditionalist moral views poorly because they are heavily biased, spread falsehoods about homosexuality and sexual conduct, and enforce an outdated moral system which I believe is unsuitable for children and adults alike.

When it comes to how I determine the child suitability of a site, I consider how dangerous it could be to the child's development and opinion formation. If the website is too biased and one-sided, or if it is hateful, discriminatory, or otherwise spreads misinformation about a given topic or issue, I will rate it poorly for child suitability (and sometimes in trustworthiness as well). If I think the content is safe and suitable for the child, however, and won't negatively influence them in any way, I'll give it a good rating.

Gigamind
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 4:35 pm

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by Gigamind » Fri Sep 19, 2014 4:42 pm

Sometime I do not rate child safety.But sometime I do according to the situations.
Really if a site is unsafe to mature visitor it is unsafe for children too.But not vice versa.
I will only consider rate child safety negatively if the website is bad for all including adult.But I will not rate some known sellers on child safety if they are not trusted in particular service.For example a webhosting site as domain registrar.If I am the customer of the website and the webhosting seem to be untrusted and domain registration not having risks I will put trust to suspicious or a small negative rating leaving child safety untouched.:)

redblade7
Posts: 520
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 10:18 am

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by redblade7 » Sun Sep 28, 2014 8:02 pm

<quote user="nokkenbuer">
when I think of "children," I think of children under the age of 13 or 14. Political-charged articles and websites are of course suitable for adolescents and adults, since they are capable of developing informed, sophisticated opinions on political, religious, and ethical issues (even though many don't).
[/quote]

That's what I was getting at when including gay rights, generally the parents and schools decide when sexual subject matter is a part of the child's life, and by 13-14 puberty has usually happened so they would know about these things and begin exploring their sexuality. "Kids" I would usually refer to 8-9 or younger.

I believe this translates into the lower green bar for Child Safety.

alfainstitute
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:34 pm

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by alfainstitute » Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:34 pm

I think it is very difficult to check trustworthiness and child child suitability of a website unless it is reviewed manually.

redblade7
Posts: 520
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 10:18 am

RE: How do you define "Trustworthiness" and "Child Suitability"?

Post by redblade7 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 3:46 am

We should keep the child ratings but get rid of "Only for kids" altogether as there's probably less than 10 websites on the planet that qualify.

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