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Re: Rumour, Gossip and Fake News Sites

Posted: Mon May 13, 2019 1:24 am
by A440
Here is another tricky site which is just one of several sites which promote a health scare concerning WiFi and 5G technology:

radiationhealthrisks.com

The site makes claims based upon papers which can at best suggest that there maybe links between observed effects in control groups and exposure to WiFi signals (no conclusive proof whatsoever). This is the nadir of fake science at its trickest and should be rated accordingly.

Here is just one example from this sites links:
In conclusion, the present findings suggest that Wi-Fi exposure may exert gender-related alterations on neural activity associated with the amount of attentional resources engaged during a linguistic test adjusted to induce WM.
No clear results, just a "suggestion" that there is some causality involved, yet this is enough for the site to state that "Are there really dangerous levels of RF radiation in my home? The truth in today’s world is “yes”, very much so. Often very dangerous levels of radiation!"
This is what a science bs site looks like.

Re: Rumour, Gossip and Fake News Sites

Posted: Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:24 am
by huckleberrypie
A440 wrote: ↑
Mon May 13, 2019 1:24 am
Here is another tricky site which is just one of several sites which promote a health scare concerning WiFi and 5G technology:

radiationhealthrisks.com

The site makes claims based upon papers which can at best suggest that there maybe links between observed effects in control groups and exposure to WiFi signals (no conclusive proof whatsoever). This is the nadir of fake science at its trickest and should be rated accordingly.

Here is just one example from this sites links:
In conclusion, the present findings suggest that Wi-Fi exposure may exert gender-related alterations on neural activity associated with the amount of attentional resources engaged during a linguistic test adjusted to induce WM.
No clear results, just a "suggestion" that there is some causality involved, yet this is enough for the site to state that "Are there really dangerous levels of RF radiation in my home? The truth in today’s world is “yes”, very much so. Often very dangerous levels of radiation!"
This is what a science bs site looks like.
I've had a client who asked me on Facebook if I could permanently disable Wifi on their kids' tablets. I guess she must be one of those who believed in such malarkey, though it's understandable as to why some would be cautious over electromagnetic radiation being emitted by the devices we use.

Anyway, here are two other sites which might as well deserve the red rating as they're nothing more than fly-by-night yellow kid sites:
echilon.com
cracsip.com

Both sites just showed up out of the blue, and while their news items such as "Amazon to Close Food Delivery Service on June 24" do seem true I wouldn't trust a random blog to spit out news items regardless, especially if it was delivered through unsolicited emails.

A political disinformation site

Posted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 6:25 pm
by A440
Here is a site, run by Republican consultants, who engage in disinformation and libel:
vicimediagroup.com

As per a New York Times article on them:
nytimes.com/2019/06/29/us/politics/biden-trump-consultant-disinformation.html

Another disinformation site

Posted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 1:31 am
by A440
The NYTimes has an interesting article on yet another political disinformation site, run by the same guy who put out that bit of libel and gossip over Wille Horton:
WesternJournal.com
This site demonstrates just how political disinformation sites work:
The message comes first, then facts carefully selected to support it. Only after editors decide the framing of a story, and write the headline, is it handed off to a pool of contract writers, most working remotely. Deadlines are tight: A typical story must be filed within 30 minutes.
nytimes.com/2019/08/21/us/facebook-disinformation-floyd-brown.html

Re: Rumour, Gossip and Fake News Sites

Posted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:37 am
by huckleberrypie
Some scumbags have been capitalising on the recent Taal Volcano eruption lately through the usual spread of misinformation:
live.tv-netw0rks-channel.com

That site acts as a gateway to hxxps://feeds.ucacvpa.com/#read/159, which is some phony Facebook page claiming to have breaking news about a supposed 7.8 magnitude earthquake in the Philippines which while it is possible according to reputed agencies, is unfortunately being exploited by charlatans sowing discord for them affiliate clicks. Fortunately, FB has caught wind of this and flagged said sites as malicious.

Re: live.tv-netw0rks-channel.com

Posted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 3:18 am
by A440
That site looks as if it is dead. Nothing comes up when I check it.

Re: libbycopeland.com

Posted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 5:19 am
by A440
Here is another site that promotes the work of a former Washington Post writer, who wrote mainly to flog DNA projects which were connected to the notorious ancestry.com.
Apparently this site illegally harvested my email address from a Washington Post account I used to have just so as to spam me for this author's new book, which promotes DNA testing. DNA testing is not beneficial unless one works for law enforcement or is trying to discover who your real parents are. There is no real benefit to it, despite this hack author's claims.

libbycopeland.com

Re: Tools for evaluating sites

Posted: Wed May 06, 2020 5:56 am
by A440
Considering the plethora of disinformation and conspiracy-promoting, click-bait sites today, I have found one very useful tool in evaluating sites for the quality of their content and intentions and that is:

mediabiasfactcheck.com

So far, I have found them to be very reliable.

Re: Rumour, Gossip and Fake News Sites

Posted: Sun Jun 14, 2020 6:49 am
by A440
There are so many sites nowadays which are a source of political disinformation and this is just one of them:

thefederalistpapers.org

See: www.mediabiasfactcheck.com/the-federali ... s-project/
for a detailed analysis. This site links to another discredited site dailycaller(dot)com for some articles. Other articles have no source for their claims either.

Here is a small example of lies they have promoted on this site:
“New law (in California) makes it illegal to shower and do laundry on same day” – FALSE
"All living former presidents have refused to attend Donald Trump’s inauguration." – FALSE
“Muslims’ disturbing plan comes out after grocery stores go bare to prepare for Irma.” – MOSTLY FALSE

Please rate this site accordingly.
www.mywot.com/scorecard/thefederalistpapers.org

Re: Several more conspiracy/pseudoscience sites

Posted: Sun Jun 14, 2020 2:27 pm
by A440
Here is another list of sites that promote disinformation for religious purposes as well as pseudoscience:

innerstrength.zone
faithit.com


If you check these against mediabiasfactcheck.com, you will see a breakdown of just how these site work.